Archive: May 2012

Good and bad news in manufacturing

First, the good: March 2012 U.S. manufacturing technology orders were $495.97 million according to AMT – The Association For Manufacturing Technology. March orders were up 11.3% from February 2012 but down 1.4% from $502.89 million in March 2011. With a year-to-date total of $1,356.70 million, 2012 is up 12.9% from the same period in 2011….

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Manufacturing market update

From Business Week: Factory bookings for long-lasting goods rose 0.3 percent last month after falling 3.9 percent in March, according to the median forecasts of 61 economists surveyed by Bloomberg News before a May 24 Commerce Department report. Other figures may show purchases of existing and new houses also climbed. Manufacturers may keep forging ahead…

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machinery

U.S. manufacturing's next phase

Richard Daley and Bruce Katz’s Op-Ed in the LA Times caught our eye, highlighting the ever-changing nature of manufacturing, here and abroad: Corporate cost calculations undergird the newfound appreciation of U.S. manufacturing. The offshoring of manufacturing was rooted in harsh economic realities: rock-bottom wages in nations such as China and the aggressive attraction and infrastructure strategies…

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flooded factory

Signs of Flood Damaged Equipment

In a perfect world, factory equipment damaged by flooding would find its way to the landfill, unfit for use after spending time (sometimes even days) underwater. However commercial consumers, especially small business owners should, be on the look out for flood damaged goods be sold at rock bottom prices. There are a few signs to help you vet…

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factory engineer

More Good News for US Manufacturing

From the Wall Street Journal: U.S. manufacturers are more competitive with global rivals than at any time in recent memory. Energy costs and other expenses are falling, manufacturers say. And U.S. workers’ pay has become more competitive with foreign wages. It all means investors should spend more time focusing on shares of chemical companies, auto…

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